Why do evolutionary psychologists think men are wired to spread their seed?

Jun 2014
1
0
USA
I would think that people with psych education like that would know better than to think there is truth to that because of how obviously off-base it really seems to be.

Going back to the dawn of time basically when humans lived as wild animals, men had to protect women from wild animals which he would need to be around for. I just don't get why men would be wired for a mating method that contradicts their natural physical role of physical protection. The woman and offspring would be nothing but sitting ducks without a strong male to protect them so what exactly is the value in men spreading their seed all over the place? What is the point of creating an offspring if it is just going to immediately die because it is a sitting duck with no protection from a male?

This mating behavior for males doesn't work in our species because for humans it's the males who are designed for fighting and protection, female humans don't have the physical credentials to fight other predatory animals. It's not like with lions or wolves where the mother actually can protect the young- only the males of the human species are built for that. So yeah, why would males be wired to leave like that if it would ultimately lead to the women and children being slaughtered off by wild animals like a helpless bag of kitty mix for predatory cats?
 
Jun 2014
1
0
Las Vegas
I think the general concept is by 'spreading their seed' their is a better chance for some offspring to survive. If you only mate with one female, the number of offspring are limited. If you mate with three females, you increase the chances some of your offspring will survive. And, when you get older, the more offspring you have the better. You are better off having 10 children with 3 women and 6 die than having 3 children with one woman and 1 dies.

Edit: And those that adopted the 'spread the seed' strategy ended up surviving, while those that did not adopt the strategy died off, hence the evolutionary theory of it being 'wired-in'.
 
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