What is the "anatomy" of "believing"?

Feb 2011
1,196
1
USA
I take much comfort in the fact that you don't know where I live--but you won't understand that either.
A retaliatory reply to that would be: "That indicates early warning sign of your recidivism/reversion/relapse. Notify your next of kin NOW".
But that would only spiral you down deeper into your condition.
You want help, not an escalation of your condition; did you stop meditating and yoga too soon?
 
Feb 2011
1,196
1
USA
Change/Learning takes place on unconscious/involuntary level.

You know you succeeded when you 'do' them without thinking.
We become aware of change/learning 'after the fact' by doing without thinking.
When your still thinking about change/learning, you have not succeeded yet.
When you do change/learn, you won't see the structure, but you will see and experience the effects.

This is academic, but IF we could have asked Pavlov's dog; "Is the sound of the bell really food?"
When we believe a thought, we might ask ourselves an analogous question; "Is this thought really true?"
Why don't we ask that of ourselves? Most likely because we don't recognize 'believing' when we do it automatically/unwittingly.
Taking it for granted that our thoughts are true, causes much needless emotional suffering/misery.
 
Last edited:
Feb 2011
1,196
1
USA
When you believe automatically, your reacting automatically.

Do you evaluate your thoughts before reacting to them? Or do you believe automatically per conditioning?
(Evaluating and believing have different effects/affects).

Did Pavlov's dog 'want' to react to the sound of a bell?
We too are conditioned, (and condition ourselves further every time we 'believe' a thought). Are we not evolved enough yet to regulate/use conditioning as we see fit?
We managed to learn to regulate our sphincters. We do that with 'intention'; why not do the same with conditioning?
 
Last edited:
Feb 2011
1,196
1
USA
Some want to debate which came first, emotions or thoughts?

We are born hard wired to emote; we learn language/thinking later, after birth.
There's no doubt we're hard wired to emote automatically, (anger/fear etc.) We don't consciously chose to experience anger/fear etc.
Humans have the capacity/ability to learn language/thinking and use those learned skills.
Thoughts are often mistaken for perceptions, and so our amygdalas react to them as if perceptions.

In plain sight, yet unrecognized. 'Bogyman' thought/image was in plain sight but unrecognized as thought image;(temporarily).
Hysterical amnesia and blindness is terminology from Freud's day. The conditions are still in vogue.
If you don't react to 'bogyman' thought anymore, because you recognize it as 'thought';
why would you react to the spoken thoughts of a bully or others derisive thoughts said to you? Because part of our brain does not recognize them as thought/opinion.
Our amygdalas react to thoughts as they do to perceptions. Our amygdalas evolved in primitive times.
The first time some cowboys saw a movie,(set up in saloon) they drew their gun and fired at the villain on the screen. When we react to thought per se, aren't we just as naive?
Thought recognition is empowering.

There was a time when it was believed the earth was flat. The current 'false belief' is that thoughts are perceptions,(having the same certainty).
The difference between the old and current false beliefs is that the current one is covert/subliminal/ tacit premise, and so harder to detect/expose.
 
Last edited:
Feb 2015
11
0
United States
Well, it's a handy place to keep ones personal journal but Aspergers was my first guess--no sense of social protocols.
Yep, I can see that.

I guess what I find interesting is how it is basically the same journal entry just rephrased 1,200 times. OCD?

It is like the guy in the shining that wrote a thousand times, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy," except in this case Sakoz takes that one sentence and rephrases it again and again.

And why the need to put this one idea in a place for public discussion if his/her intention is to simply push an ideology? Why not create a blog, where the journal could just flow? It seems Sakoz has some need for social interaction. Also related to Aspergers or some other psychological issue?