Thoughts/reactions please. The core goal of any psychotherapy is

Jan 2012
40
0
New York
to find a comfortable and effective way to deal with unwanted involuntary responses/reactions. Period.
If all involuntary responses were comfortable and wanted, psychotherapy for emotions would have nothing to do.
There would be no neurosis.

Please feel free to debate this point whether you disagree or not. I'm looking for points I might be blind to since I completely agree with the above at this point.
 
May 2011
884
0
Marble, N.C.
Sorter,
The three main words here are comfortable effective and neurosis. The patient/client believes they have this problem. But they do not realize (they cause it). Without people there would be no reason for neurosis of any kind. I feel any neurosis is self afflicted. Some can work it out others cannot for whatever reason.

I am convinced outside stimuli is the most cause of self afflicted neurosis. Monkey see monkey believe. Then's there ignorance. Drugs are a cop out for the patient. Until man/womenkind teach there children the basic about there emotions, there will always be a neurosis and mental health. Paul



[quote author=sorter link=topic=3172.msg23022#msg23022 date=1358952857]
to find a comfortable and effective way to deal with unwanted involuntary responses/reactions. Period.
If all involuntary responses were comfortable and wanted, psychotherapy for emotions would have nothing to do.
There would be no neurosis.

Please feel free to debate this point whether you disagree or not. I'm looking for points I might be blind to since I completely agree with the above at this point.


[/quote]
 
Nov 2008
2,536
0
U.S.A.
At least some mental conditions can be traced to improper diet and lack of certain chemicals in the system. I have seen studies were people who had mental conditions saw improvement by just taking a multi vitamin everyday. A friend of mine's daughter was in an instituion and was unresponsive to medications. I mentioned the nutrition angle to him and he mentioned it to her doctors. They maintained it would only be a placebo effect. He tried it anyway and in one week she was aware and wanted to go home. She became obsessed with diet and nutrition. She married her nutritionist. She stll takes medication, but now the medication works. Were as before it did not.
 
Jan 2012
40
0
New York
[quote author=S. Earl Martin link=topic=3172.msg23033#msg23033 date=1359047667]
At least some mental conditions can be traced to improper diet and lack of certain chemicals in the system. I have seen studies were people who had mental conditions saw improvement by just taking a multi vitamin everyday. A friend of mine's daughter was in an instituion and was unresponsive to medications.
[/quote]
I completely agree but I'm talking about how one responds to a mental condition or automatic impulses that can't be controlled.

Example:
Pour nutrition could cause depression.
Person A responds to the depression by realizing they need to get healthier. They do and the depression is cured.
The depression was accepted. The feelings weren't unwanted, fought or repressed.

Person B doesn't want the depression, fights it, goes to therapy to "figure" it out, gets antidepressants etc.

Here is maybe a more clear version of the theory I'm trying to find holes in but can't:
There is one core element to all psychological pain and
if that element doesn't exist, there would be no pain and no reason for therapy.
That element is internal experience we can't (directly) control AND that
is UNWANTED--we try to repress or ignore.

I can't think of any example of psychological pain that doesn't include some rejection of one's own experience.
We can take a suicidal run at bullets and canons, and feel perfectly fine about it if we believe in some just cause.
Any fear is fully accepted and not resisted. At least until we start the run.