Question

Nov 2020
3
0
Bloemfontein South Africa
Hi I am 20 years old and I suffer from acute anxiety disorder and OCD.
I have a question...
I really love masks, I really do. Bane's mask, deathstroke's mask, the joker's mask, I own a call of duty ghosts balaclava (which I wear all day at home) etc...
I was wondering what psychology says about a mentally ill person that really loves masks and whether there is any correlation?
I just feel more comfortable when I am wearing a mask and just feel more like myself.
 
Mar 2020
235
19
US
I'm a patient. You're probably not going to get a therapist here. I'm one of the only guys that posts back as far as I can tell...

I never had a mask obsession, but what masks mean to me is that a person is mysteriously without an identity.

I played medieval strategy games and the characters with masks are always getting more respect from me cause they appear to be "godlike" in a way.

Without a face, a person is less capable of being judged, and guessed. That adds to a control ability for him to be unpredictable, which demands respect.

As far as baklava, that's more of a uniform type mask, and it doesn't cover the eyes, so the eyes do all the talking. Typically when you get a bunch of guys wearing baklava, they're eyes assume a uniform look.

Banes mask is a mouth, nose only mask. And it's iconic of one man, ad a breathing apparatus. The fact that it is a breathing apparatus means although he's a perfect fit guy, he's got a contrasting very serious handicap, which would be possible in reality. It expands on the fantasy, which is pleasurable to fantasize.

My favorite mask was the leper king in kingdom of heaven with orlando bloom. The full face solid silver make wax perfect to me. He looked like a ghost who couldn't be seen, read, or killed. These masks made of solid precious metal also reflected " watch me waste money on a decoration to cover my face" imagine how much precious metal went into that mask.

It could be you want to imagine yourself as an impenetrable ghost. You might feel like without the mask you are ordinary, weak, and uninfluencial. You might consider your ordinariness to be discussing and worthy of shame.

I recommend you keep the masks as trophies. And go without them. If you don't have a good mirror in your living space, buy a big as you can afford mirror and put it right in the middle of a room, where you will always see your own face.

I like to make faces in the mirror, and crack jokes on the mirror. But that's just me.

Also you might like I have a fear of becoming a narcissist. This could mean that you would always put yourself down just to prevent glazed over eyes and toxic gravitational pull. I i bet you're far from narcisist if you like masks.

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Nov 2020
3
0
Bloemfontein South Africa
Thank you for your input.

What I do feel it could be is: since I was very young I was very sensitive when it came to certain emotional things, this heavily contributed to me developing anxiety disorder and I was always ashamed to show my emotions as I was always told that I was too sensitive. I feel that the mask hides my face and makes it harder for people to see my emotion and in turn this makes me more comfortable.
I sometimes feel like I have a bit of a mad side to me, my close friends have also told me that sometimes they sense a bit of madness in me.
Maybe the masks also make me feel like I can express my madness a bit and embrace it a little bit?
 
Nov 2020
3
0
Bloemfontein South Africa
I was also bullied quite a lot for being weak and overweight. I've been working out for years now but still never feel strong enough, maybe the mask gives me that sense of power and respect that I crave (as you said masks generally demand fear and respect)
 
Mar 2020
235
19
US
I respect you for having masks. And I'm sure you're admirably frightening. It sounds like you'd like to change your weight and strength... I'm not a clinician but I've studied on my own nutrition.

Your body reacts in certain ways only to amino acids, minerals, and vitamins, and perhaps other types of unnatural chemicals that I advise you to avoid.

Vitamin B1 is directly responsible for turning fat into energy, and choline is a precursor of acytl choline, which is the chemical that binds to your muscles and makes it contract.

Sensitivity is from a very beneficial quality of seeing and hearing very keenly. I had paranoia that came from hyper association. I was very sensitive as well, but I deliberately was ruthless and played ruthless strategy games and martial arts to kill off my sensitivity. I found myself in my 20s obsessed with agression and fantasies of cutting people's throats and throwing them on the ground. I bought medical cutlery and bows and arrows. I never used them. I just liked carrying them around...

One day I had a friend who was more like a machivellian advisary visiting me... Long story short I thought he could take a scare and slapped him on the hand with the flat edge of my sword and spent 30 days in jail...

The harrassment of the inmates was terrible. I was granted solitary. And I shut down my brain to a childlike state that took me two years to recover...

I will never own cutlery again. And me scaring people is worse than being slapped with a 2x4.

Now I am insensitive because I've blown my ears out with headphones everyday all day for 2 years. I rubbed warm cigarette ash in my eyes because I was tired of seeing. I wear glasses when I want to see and take them off to relax. I don't recommend it.

My hyper association was the real problem and I had to self learn my identity as a human with anatomy and physiology. Until I narrowed myself down to a few concepts only. I am so small in my own eyes.

Now I can communicate modestly, and I'm trying to discover a career path. This requires a sense of physics outside my body after studying the physics and mechanics of what I actually am.

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