Neuroscience

May 2011
884
0
Marble, N.C.
Enigma,
Concerning the glial cells. Is it possible to introduce in to that cell a brain enhancing drug that can create more cells to expand and get more intelligence (so to speak)? pljames



[quote author=Enigma link=topic=1635.msg11518#msg11518 date=1288703363]
It's not about the number of neurons in the brain, it's all about the glial cells. They're the workhorses of the brain: supplying nutrients, insulating and protecting neurons, removing dead neurons and excess neurotransmitters, destroying pathogens, forming myelin, and modulate signal transmission. They are literally the glue that holds the brain together (glia is Greek for glue). Einstein's brain had an average amount of neurons and a above average number of glial cells.
[/quote]
 
Dec 2008
609
0
nil
Heh, when I first clicked on this thread I failed to notice it was from 2010 and was preparing to write pretty much the exact same post as I did before. Anyway, in regards to your question, yes there are drugs designed to increase intelligence (not just intelligence, but also cognition, memory, attention, etc), they are called nootropics (not a misspelling). They typically work by enhancing neurotransmitters or hormones, not glial cells. However, brain chemistry is a tricky beast. Trying to boost neurochemicals is an everywhere or nowhere kind of thing. Its impossible to make a drug that targets a specific brain area; once ingested, a drug is metabolized and distributed equally to the entire brain (which is why "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI, is a misnomer. You can't "selectively" target serotonin reuptake. Once you take an SSRI, serotonin reuptake is inhibited across your entire brain). Also, the price for enhancing one thing is that a lot of other things are going to be affected. The creation of glial cells is regulated in part by FGF (aka fibroplast growth factor), a protein that is plays a big part in embryonic development and for a great many other things in the adult brain including wound healing, blood vessel growth, and a large variety of cellular growth. There are drugs that can enhance FGF, which can result in increased glial cell generation, but that's one of many effects.
 
May 2011
884
0
Marble, N.C.
Enigma,
You remember Mash the T.V.show. They introduced the placebo effect so is it possible for one to visually see in there mind these drugs at work and create a mind thought to work together with these drugs for enhancement of memory and brain function? I am beginning to believe that the minds visual thoughts can enhance the brain or vice versa? pljames



[quote author=Enigma link=topic=1635.msg22536#msg22536 date=1353740730]
Heh, when I first clicked on this thread I failed to notice it was from 2010 and was preparing to write pretty much the exact same post as I did before. Anyway, in regards to your question, yes there are drugs designed to increase intelligence (not just intelligence, but also cognition, memory, attention, etc), they are called nootropics (not a misspelling). They typically work by enhancing neurotransmitters or hormones, not glial cells. However, brain chemistry is a tricky beast. Trying to boost neurochemicals is an everywhere or nowhere kind of thing. Its impossible to make a drug that targets a specific brain area; once ingested, a drug is metabolized and distributed equally to the entire brain (which is why "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI, is a misnomer. You can't "selectively" target serotonin reuptake. Once you take an SSRI, serotonin reuptake is inhibited across your entire brain). Also, the price for enhancing one thing is that a lot of other things are going to be affected. The creation of glial cells is regulated in part by FGF (aka fibroplast growth factor), a protein that is plays a big part in embryonic development and for a great many other things in the adult brain including wound healing, blood vessel growth, and a large variety of cellular growth. There are drugs that can enhance FGF, which can result in increased glial cell generation, but that's one of many effects.
[/quote]
 
May 2011
884
0
Marble, N.C.
Enigma,
You're telling me I am my brain and vice versa? I agree the brain comes first then the mind. When does consciousness or awareness come into play? i would speculate from outside visual stimuli plus language. Put the two together and you have knowledge. In the beginning of these two actions add memory and feelings and you have total awareness or consciousness? I further believe the brain is one dimension the mind one dimension and consciousness one dimension therefore we are multidimensional beings?

I am now wondering if visual mind images enhances the brain and mind to enhance thinking of both brain and mind? If I am brain I am conscious and aware, could I look into a mirror and talk to me, my brain and mind to enhance positive actions by speaking them or thoughts about doing same? pljames


[quote author=Enigma link=topic=1635.msg22536#msg22536 date=1353740730]
Heh, when I first clicked on this thread I failed to notice it was from 2010 and was preparing to write pretty much the exact same post as I did before. Anyway, in regards to your question, yes there are drugs designed to increase intelligence (not just intelligence, but also cognition, memory, attention, etc), they are called nootropics (not a misspelling). They typically work by enhancing neurotransmitters or hormones, not glial cells. However, brain chemistry is a tricky beast. Trying to boost neurochemicals is an everywhere or nowhere kind of thing. Its impossible to make a drug that targets a specific brain area; once ingested, a drug is metabolized and distributed equally to the entire brain (which is why "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor, or SSRI, is a misnomer. You can't "selectively" target serotonin reuptake. Once you take an SSRI, serotonin reuptake is inhibited across your entire brain). Also, the price for enhancing one thing is that a lot of other things are going to be affected. The creation of glial cells is regulated in part by FGF (aka fibroplast growth factor), a protein that is plays a big part in embryonic development and for a great many other things in the adult brain including wound healing, blood vessel growth, and a large variety of cellular growth. There are drugs that can enhance FGF, which can result in increased glial cell generation, but that's one of many effects.
[/quote]