Need some guidance

Jan 2022
1
2
Australia
Dear someone,

I just need to nut this out and I'm hoping for maybe some guidance or something like that.

Many years ago (9 years to be precise) I experienced what I believed was a nervous breakdown. I lost the plot to the point of having irrational thoughts and illusions. I subsequently fell into a very deep depression to the point of feeling completely numb and with absolutely no motivation to do anything. I couldn't get out of bed and it was such a difficult thing to just get a plate out of the cupboard.

I managed to climb out of this situation pretty well but I still don't feel like I want to feel.

To put things in perspective, I was studying a degree when my breakdown occurred and it took me longer to complete it. The good news is that I completed it (which I had doubts that I would do so) but my grades fell from what they use to be.

Currently, I experience melancholy and a degree of depression but it is not too severe. I am able to work but my motivation and excitement of things in life isn't like it use to be. Before my breakdown I was very motivated in my career. I could study and work for long hours and achieve great results. Now, I can still work but I find that I have limits. I find it very challenging to my nerves to push the limits past a usual working day. When I read I find it can exhaust me mentally, whereas before I could read, research for ages with enthusiasm. Also, my critical thinking and ability to intellectualize things I feel has changed. It's like my mind doesn't want to be pushed past first gear.

I am basically wondering if someone could give me some help on how to climb out of this. Even though I am so much better I do feel there is room to improve. Even though it's been 9 years since the event I do feel the residue fairly constantly throughout the day.

Many thanks.
 
Jul 2021
785
103
London
Dear someone,

I just need to nut this out and I'm hoping for maybe some guidance or something like that.

Many years ago (9 years to be precise) I experienced what I believed was a nervous breakdown. I lost the plot to the point of having irrational thoughts and illusions. I subsequently fell into a very deep depression to the point of feeling completely numb and with absolutely no motivation to do anything. I couldn't get out of bed and it was such a difficult thing to just get a plate out of the cupboard.

I managed to climb out of this situation pretty well but I still don't feel like I want to feel.

To put things in perspective, I was studying a degree when my breakdown occurred and it took me longer to complete it. The good news is that I completed it (which I had doubts that I would do so) but my grades fell from what they use to be.

Currently, I experience melancholy and a degree of depression but it is not too severe. I am able to work but my motivation and excitement of things in life isn't like it use to be. Before my breakdown I was very motivated in my career. I could study and work for long hours and achieve great results. Now, I can still work but I find that I have limits. I find it very challenging to my nerves to push the limits past a usual working day. When I read I find it can exhaust me mentally, whereas before I could read, research for ages with enthusiasm. Also, my critical thinking and ability to intellectualize things I feel has changed. It's like my mind doesn't want to be pushed past first gear.

I am basically wondering if someone could give me some help on how to climb out of this. Even though I am so much better I do feel there is room to improve. Even though it's been 9 years since the event I do feel the residue fairly constantly throughout the day.

Many thanks.
Numbness is not generally a symptom of major depression, however, it has been observed in bipolar disorder (a non-unipolar type of depression) and in certain other personality disorders, such as in schizoid etc. I am thinking howevere that you could get that feeling if you had a physical kind of illness, rather than psychological though and then yes you are depressed too as a consequence, but because of an underlying physical health issue.

That being said, this is just for information, in reality, all you can do is go to the doctor and explain the situation to him and let him either direct you to a therapist, or diagnose you if he has a specialisation in psychiatry or something else, as this forum is just to help provide some information, it isn't to make diagnoses, in the end without an assessment you can't really do a diagnosis, although yes, you can theorise a diagnosis, you need to know the patient, more in depth.


An example there is a famous psychologist (nonames) that claims that the HSP construct is not real, and that the HSP construct is a way to hide covert narcissists. In reality, I know he is wrong, because I have this HSP thing and it is nothing like being a covert narcissist. Perhaps on the surface it may appear that way, but in reality it is quite the opposite, it just requires more in-depth analysis, if someone like a famous psychologist who ok, isn't specialised in this stuff, but specialised only in one thing, is capable of making a mistake, then imagine, someone who isn't even famous. Eventually he even said however, that he doesn't understand others, due to his own sickness, and that it is possible that HSPs exist, but still he never made a video about the HSP because he doesn't understand them.

This is not always the case, as there are really intuitive practitioners too, but imagine how many lives a clinician in the hospital or in a pharmacy saves, yet, noone knows their names, or even the dentist or the vet. Noone even has heard of them, so it doesn't really mean anything. Hope it helps.

It is also true, on another note which is unrelated to the previous statements, that in some places you do get malpractice too, and that is another reality, but it is still 1 percent of the population, so the majority hopefully will be responsible, competent, passionate and good regardless of the 1 percent bad influence.
 
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Aug 2021
370
181
Texas, USA
It sounds like you have begun the road to recovery, but may have stagnated. The more you do, the better you will become. Our mind works like our muscles! The more you challenge it, the stronger it becomes. Exercise is also a good motivational tool, as strenuous exercise will release endorphins which will make you feel better. Take breaks from your work or studies, and go for a brisk walk or move around the room, whatever it takes to get your brain reset and the blood flowing in your system again. I agree that it sounds like you are still haunted by depression, which is not uncommon, even on medications. If you want to try and help yourself, look into Cognitive Behavior Therapy (for Dummies). You can find books at the local library or used. Good luck, you will get better with patience and practice...
Ivery
 
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