How do YOU deal with depression?

Oct 2012
4
0
Hi. I'm new here, my name is Renee and I'm 21 years old. Here's my short story:

I've been depressed for 5 years, since my sister passed away. For about a year I took my depression as a normal reaction and way of dealing but I never came out of it, it just got worse. I have seen a (money sucking) psychologist for 2 years about this and have figured out all the numerous things that are depressing me but I still can't get out of it. And what is left of my life is being destroyed.

So this goes out to anyone who has ever been depressed:
How do you come out of depression? What do you think about, what do u listen to, what do u read to get out of this horrible living death?


Anyone with any answers, comments or suggestions, please answer.
Thank you
 
Jan 2012
40
0
New York
I was very depressed when I was sixteen. I tried yoga and meditation.
That not only cured it but I felt better than I ever dreamed I could.

My view:
Depression is a form of emotional exhaustion usually from fighting particular feelings (repression),
sometimes fighting feeling depressed.

Understanding what makes you depressed won't necessarily change anything.
I would think a responsible psychologist, long before two years, would admit their treatment isn't helping you
and suggest someone else or a different kind of therapy. But I won't get started on my opinions on psychotherapists.

Now when I feel depressed I dive into it. I let it give me the rest it can give me.
I lay on the couch and shut out the world.
I look for how those feelings can help me. I indulge those feelings in any way I can.
I haven't been depressed for more than a day in many years.
 
Sep 2012
96
0
Rochester, New York
You know why psychologists are famous?
Come into my office and put your feet up on the couch.
Try it at home for 50 minutes a day and try to just relax on your couch while you do it.
They are famous for depression. The couch and the whole nine yards.
It might not bring you all the way out. You will still have to see the world but remember the scariest thing out there are flowers.
 
Jan 2012
40
0
New York
Studies schmuties
From christophermartell.com/ba.php
"In 1996 Jacobson and colleagues (Jacobson, et al, 1996) conducted a study of the effective ingredients in CBT for depression. They found that there were no differences in treatment outcome between CBT compared to behavioral activation (BA) alone."

Obviously behavioral activation hasn't eradicated depression.

Of course, if you get into bed and continue the same exhausting depressing processes, then you'll stay depressed.
 

SWM

May 2008
2,314
0
[quote author=sorter link=topic=3056.msg22198#msg22198 date=1351804865]

Studies schmuties
From christophermartell.com/ba.php
"In 1996 Jacobson and colleagues (Jacobson, et al, 1996) conducted a study of the effective ingredients in CBT for depression. They found that there were no differences in treatment outcome between CBT compared to behavioral activation (BA) alone."

Obviously behavioral activation hasn't eradicated depression.


Of course, if you get into bed and continue the same exhausting depressing processes, then you'll stay depressed.


[/quote]Eradicated? how would that even be possible?

I dont have exact figures in front of me but recover rates for CBT are around 70%. NICE guidelines has expecations of at least 50% of people entering treatment achieving recovery.

IF BA is equivalant then we could expect 50-70% of people engaging in BA to achieve recovery.

erdication would never be possible because mammals are biologically constructed such that they experience depression/anxiety/anger.
 
Jan 2012
40
0
New York
Studies schmuties times two.
Science can only report on what it can observe. The psyche is not observable, only its behavior.
The validity of studies depends on controlling, accounting for, variables.
The psyche has way way too many variables for any kind of cause and effect conclusions.
Studies in psychology are interesting at best, never conclusive.

"erdication would never be possible because mammals are biologically constructed such that they experience depression/anxiety/anger."
That is definitely an opinion, not fact.
It might be fact now (I say might), but never say never. Have some hope.

If you suddenly perceived (sensory, not thought) exactly the way a dog does, and a tree fell in the woods, would it make a sound?
Don't know. How a dog experiences the world could be so different that you wouldn't recognize it as a "sound."
 

SWM

May 2008
2,314
0
Depression is not confined to the observable psyche. Depression is observable in the central and autonomic nervous system.
 
Jan 2012
40
0
New York
[quote author=SWM link=topic=3056.msg22204#msg22204 date=1351836713]
Depression is not confined to the observable psyche. Depression is observable in the central and autonomic nervous system.
[/quote]

So you're saying when "depression" is measured as a physical state, the individual will ALWAYS report a psychological depression?
(never mind the inaccuracies of self reporting and I doubt anyone as thought to conduct such a study to support your assertion)
It's not possible that some people might react differently to the physical state you're referring to?
Here's some self reporting. I can feel very depressed physically but not psychologically depressed from the method I described above.
I figured out how to get needed rest. Psychological depression can simply be the repression (fighting) of physical and emotional exhaustion or overwhelm.
If that reaction doesn't happen--no "depression."
 

SWM

May 2008
2,314
0
@sorter
my previous post should have said unobservable psyche in response to your previous quote. i now cant find where you said "unobservable psyche".

i just want to make the point that i would not use the term psyche myself in the context of discussing a clinical presentation such as the one in this topic.

[quote author=sorter link=topic=3056.msg22207#msg22207 date=1351861352]
[quote author=SWM link=topic=3056.msg22204#msg22204 date=1351836713]
Depression is not confined to the observable psyche. Depression is observable in the central and autonomic nervous system.
[/quote]

So you're saying when "depression" is measured as a physical state, the individual will ALWAYS report a psychological depression?
(never mind the inaccuracies of self reporting and I doubt anyone as thought to conduct such a study to support your assertion)[/quote]

http://hd.media.mit.edu/tech-reports/TR-595.pdf
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/09/070905203624.htm
http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v11/n7/abs/nrn2867.html


I figured out how to get needed rest. Psychological depression can simply be the repression (fighting) of physical and emotional exhaustion or overwhelm.
sounds similar to how someone with chronic fatigue syndrome might experience depression.